Darfur: water interventions protect women

Thursday, May 26, 2011

  • 2011-05-25-darfur-water-Picture 29.jpgWomen carry water containers from a water point at Deleij camp near Garsila, West Darfur. ACT Alliance and Caritas Internationalis has been present in the Darfur region of Sudan through the Norwegian Church Aid operation since 2005. ACT/Caritas/NCA/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
  • 2011-05-25-darfur-water-Picture 36.jpgWomen collect water at a water point in the Deleij camp near Garsila, West Darfur. The ACT and Caritas programme in Darfur plans to dig 24 additional boreholes in 2011. ACT/Caritas/NCA/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
  • 2011-05-25-darfur-water-Picture-42.jpgIn 2010, ACT and Caritas water, sanitation and hygiene promotion activities reached 232,022 internally displaced persons and 116,770 persons from rural and returnee areas of South and West Darfur. ACT/Caritas/NCA/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
  • 2011-05-25-darfur-water-Picture 55.jpgBladder attendant Adam works at a solar-powered pumping station at Deleij camp near Garsila, West Darfur. Five new solar powered pumping systems are planned for 2011 along with the replacement of three fuel powered systems with solar alternatives. ACT/Caritas/NCA/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
  • 2011-05-25-darfur-water-Picture 67.jpgWater for livestock is critical for communities, which depend on their livestock as a source of livelihood. The ACT and Caritas program in Darfur plans to install 92 hand pumps in 2011. ACT/Caritas/NCA/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
  • 2011-05-25-darfur-water-Picture 70.jpgDecreasing the distance between homes and water points is a critical strategy for protection of girls and women, who often are responsible for much of the household labor. ACT/Caritas/NCA/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
  • 2011-05-25-darfur-water-Picture 75.jpgA boy studies a hygiene promotion sign in the Deleij camp near Garsila, West Darfur. ACT and Caritas assistance in Darfur works to integrate activities in health, nutrition, water, sanitation and hygiene. ACT/Caritas/NCA/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
  • 2011-05-25-darfur-water-Picture 77.jpgWomen share the burden together of collecting enough water to sustain their families. ACT/Caritas/NCA/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
  • 2011-05-25-darfur-water-Picture 84.jpgDecreasing the distance between homes and water points is a critical strategy for the protection of girls and women, who often are responsible for much of the household labor. ACT/Caritas/NCA/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
  • 2011-05-25-darfur-water-Picture 86.jpgACT and Caritas plan to construct 13 hand-dug wells and rehabilitate 12 hand-dug wells in South and West Darfur in 2011. ACT/Caritas/NCA/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
  • 2011-05-25-darfur-water-Picture 87.jpgThe ACT and Caritas programme aims to assist more than 360,000 people in 2011 with water, sanitation and hygiene services. ACT/Caritas/NCA/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
  • 2011-05-25-darfur-water-Picture 89.jpgOne of the key priorities for the programme is to assist both those who are internally displaced and those who are living in host communities. In 2011, at least 150,000 persons assisted by ACT and Caritas will be in returnee, host communities and rural areas. ACT/Caritas/NCA/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
  • 2011-05-25-darfur-water-Picture 93.jpgACT and Caritas through Norwegian Church Aid work to address both the quality and quantity of water for communities in accordance with the Sphere minimum humanitarian standards. In 2010, water output at NCA water points exceeded the minimum of 15 liters per person per day in camps. ACT/Caritas/NCA/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
  • 2011-05-25-darfur-water-Picture 96.jpgNorwegian Church Aid staff regularly test water quality at water points throughout South and West Darfur. ACT/Caritas/NCA/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
  • 2011-05-25-darfur-water-Picture 99.jpgNine water systems were successfully handed over to communities in 2010. This included transitioning four systems from fuel to solar-powered pumps. ACT/Caritas/NCA/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah
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